These 10 Foods Are High in Potassium—and Help Fight Belly Bloat

When we say "best food sources of potassium," your mind likely goes instantly to bananas or avocados or possibly even coconut water. While all of these are indeed great sources of potassium (as societal wellness culture has drummed into our heads for years), they're actually not the richest sources of the mineral. Of course, all three are chic and tasty and you wouldn't be hard-pressed to find a photo on Instagram featuring an epic combo of all three, but when it comes to boosting your body's (very important) potassium stores, some less popular food fares are actually significantly more strategic. Don't worry; they're still super tasty!

According to a report from Medical News Today, the average adult should be consuming about 4700 milligrams of potassium per day, but—wait for it—fewer than 2% of Americans actually get that much in their daily nosh. Eek. "A high potassium intake reduces the risk of overall mortality by 20 percent," states the report. "It also decreases the risk of stroke, lowers blood pressure, protects against loss of muscle mass, preserves bone mineral density, and reduces the formation of kidney stones." So yes, ignoring a potassium deficiency doesn't bode well for your long-term health, as it's a key player in helping our systems regulate fluid retention (which, if out of whack, can lead to bloat) while also controlling the electrical activity between our heart and muscles. As the report explains, signs of deficiency can include excessive fatigue, feelings of weakness, and constipation, and might exacerbate paralysis, respiratory failure, and painful gut obstructions.

Luckily, with a little bit of know-how and a strategic trip to the grocery store, you can naturally boost your body's potassium levels to ensure you're getting the recommended 4700 milligrams per day. Supplements also work, but most experts agree getting your intake of vitamins and minerals through whole-food sources is a smarter and more beneficial MO. Curious to know which foods are the best sources for potassium? Keep scrolling! We've even handily included serving sizes and milligram amounts so you know how much you'll need of each to reach your daily goal. Ready? Dig in! And for even more potassium-rich food ideas, check out the full list we consulted here

Sweet Potato

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Milligrams of potassium: 694 per baked potato

In addition to its wide array of other nutritional perks (like fiber and vitamins galore), this delicious side is also chock-full of potassium to keep bloating at bay and satisfaction high. 

Tomato Paste

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Milligrams of potassium: 664 per 1/4 cup

We often hear tomatoes (and their associated condiments) applauded for the high content of lycopene, but they're also incredible for boosting your potassium stores. Pass the pasta!

Beet Greens

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Milligrams of potassium: 655 per 1/2 cup, cooked

Kale, spinach, and other famous leafy greens often get all the glory when it comes to their impressive profile of vitamins and mineral. So who knew beet greens were such an under-the-radar source of potassium? They're best eaten cooked, so next time you make a warming bowl of soup or even an earth salad, consider them a hearty and healthy addition. 

White Beans

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Milligrams of potassium: 595 per 1/2 cup, canned

Beans might go down as one of the best sources of fiber and slow-burning carbs you can possibly put in your grocery cart, but as it turns out, white beans, in particular, a great source of potassium. Not sure what to do with them? Swap your normal red winter chili for white version!

Yogurt

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Milligrams of potassium: 579 per cup

We'll just go ahead and call yogurt the queen of P's—protein, probiotics, and, you guessed it, potassium. If you can tolerate dairy, it's an excellent choice, but according to the Health.gov site, the nutritional benefit will be highest if you opt for the plain, non-fat variety. 

Clams

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Milligrams of potassium: 534 per three ounces, canned

If you're a shellfish fan, you (and your potassium levels) are in luck. Just three ounces provide plenty of potassium to keep your body happy and healthy. 

Prune Juice

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Milligrams of potassium: 530 per six ounces

Even though prune juice might not sound appealing, a cup of the stuff is actually filled to the brim with nutritional benefit. From potassium to antioxidants to fiber, it has you covered. And actually, it's pretty rich and delicious. (Don't knock it until you try it!)

Carrot Juice

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Milligrams of potassium: 517 per six ounces

Juices can be hit or miss as far as nutritional content. While they're of course high in vitamins and minerals, they're also typically lower than the whole-food form in terms of fiber and higher in blood sugar–raising sugar. That said, if you opt for something straight, vegetable-based, and with no additional sugars added, you can reap some major reward. Carrot juice, as it turns out, is one of the best varieties to sip if you're looking for an uptick in potassium. 

Blackstrap Molasses

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Milligrams of potassium: 498 per tablespoon

Blackstrap is a must this time of year and is naturally high in minerals—iron, magnesium, calcium, and potassium just to name a few. Plus, it's super concentrated, so a little goes a long way as far as your supplemental efforts go. Try adding just a tablespoon to your favorite smoothie, sauce, or even healthy baked good recipe for natural potassium boost. 

Halibut

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Milligrams of potassium: 490 per three ounces, cooked

Nutritionists often praise halibut for its natural leanness (three ounces have roughly 100 calories) and high protein content. As it turns out, rounding out a healthy dinner with a palm-size portion of the fish will also do your body's potassium levels well. Just make sure to bake or grill it since a fried filet might bring excess fats (the unhealthy kind) to the forefront of your meal. 

Next up: FYI—You Might Be Wasting Your Money on Probiotics If You're Not Eating Prebiotics

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